The Flu Vaccine and Pregnancy

Posted by April Bullock on January 31st 2013. Tagged: . 0 Comments

ACHOOO!

Pregnancy brings with it a host of new decisions for women to make and is confounded by the fact that they are now making these decisions for two people, themselves and their unborn baby. During flu season it seems as though everywhere you turn institutions and MDs are recommending getting vaccinated against the flu, especially for those who are pregnant, under the age of 5 or over the age of 65. Many women accept this, receive their vaccine and move on, but there are a growing number who would like more information before making the call. One of the platforms of midwifery is informed choice so I am posting this to apprise women of some of the pros and cons of vaccination and some options for protecting themselves if they choose not to vaccinate.

Vaccine Safety and Efficacy

In order to asses the safety and effectiveness of any of the yearly flu vaccine combinations, one must conduct large critically reviewed trials. But according to a NYT article from Nov. 5, 2012, the flu vaccine was "(i)nitially developed for soldiers and approved in 1945, the vaccine was approved for civilian use a year later. In 1960, the surgeon general, Leroy E. Burney recommended vaccinating three high-risk groups: pregnant women, the chronically ill and people 65 and over"(1)  Since then it has been difficult to conduct large studies on these 3 groups because denying vaccines to one of the groups is deemed unethical. Some scientists at the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota released a report in October 2012 in which they argue that the benefits of flu vaccination have been overstated and argue for research into better vaccines.(2) 

But how does this affect you and your pregnancy? First let's look at the reasons that the CDC and the majority of MDs recommend that pregnant women receive yearly flu vaccinations.

  • According to the CDC, the flu is more likely to produce severe symptoms in a pregnant woman. This is because of the decreased immune response pregnancy induces and the extra work load placed on the pregnant woman's heart and lungs.(3) 
  • Cotnracting the flu during pregnancy can also increase a woman's risk of miscarriage or premature delivery due to the inflammatory response to the virus.
  • Their is also an increased incidence of hospitalization, morbidity and mortality. 
  • The flu shot can provide protection to mother and baby (up to 6 months postpartum).

Then consider some of the risks associated with receiving the vaccine.

  • Inactivated vaccines are recommended during pregnancy and have not been proven as effective
  • According to Dr. Mercola, the vaccine can cause an iflammatory immune response and/or suppress your immune system.
  • The flu vaccine contains a preservative (often a heavy metal), egg and chicken protiens and neomycin/polymyxin.
  • There are not enough large scale studies to prove the safety or efficacy of the flu vaccine during pregnancy.

There are some important things to ask if you decide to get the flu shot during pregnancy. One is that you should ask for the single-dose, preservative-free syringe. And the second is that pregnant women should not be administered the nasal flu vaccine. 

Alternatives to Vaccination

Luckliy there are some alternatives that rival the effectiveness of the flu vaccine. One of these options is homeopathy and the other is Chinese herbal medicine. In order for any method to keep you protected each woman needs to also practice these healthy living reccomendations which include:

  • Frequently washing your hands. The ONE proven preventive technique.
  • Taking Vitamin D3 up to 5000-15000 IU daily and Vit C supplements up to 3000mg daily.
  • Maintain adequate hydration. A good rule of thumb is to drink 1/2 your body weight in ounces daily of clear, non-carbonated/sugared fluids.
  • Maintain an alkaline state in your body. Consuming fermented foods is a good way to accomplish this. 
  • Avoid sugar and processed foods as they increase systemic inflammation.
  • Exercise regularly to increase the circulation of your immune system components.
In order to understand how homeopathy can help fend off the flu it's best to give a short description of homeopathy for those unfamiliar with this healing modality. The Hahnemann website gives an accurate overview of Homeopathy. "Homeopathy as we know it today was founded by Samuel Hahnemann, although the principle dates back as far as Hippocrates. In essence, homeopathy is based on the concept that a disease can be cured by infinitesimal doses of a substance that in larger quantities mimics disease symptoms. It is governed by the principle that "like cures like"—if a substance can cause symptoms in a healthy person, then it can cure similar symptoms in a sick person. In sections 100 and 102 of his Organon, Hahnemann describes the use of homeopathics in relation to epidemic disease."(4) One of the most compelling arguments for using homeopathy to combat the flu are the statistics of its use during the Spanish Flu pandemic of 1918. Mukash Batra in a Times of India article from 2009 states that during that pandemic where 50 million people died, the allopathically treated mortality rate was 28.2% while the mortality rate of those treated homeopathically was 1.05%.(5) Lizzia Martinez, a clinically trained homeopath in Austin, TX stated the following: "Homeopathy is a safe and effective form of alternative medicine during pregnancy. It can address both chronic and acute issues in both mother and baby. During flu season, pregnant women may experience extra stress and worry about contracting this viral illness. Fortunately, homeopathy has great resources to help! Influenzinum (Boiron) is newly prepared every year and consists of flu strains that are predicted by the World Health Organization and the CDC to be the predominant strain that season. Influenzinum can be used prophylactically, following typical dosing instructions of 1 dose per week for four weeks...thus reducing the susceptibility to the illness and greatly reducing the symptoms if it is contracted. If the full-blown flu is contracted by someone who has not used Influenzinum, homeopaths have a great many remedies in our pharmacoepia to address and mitigate extreme, acute symptoms."(6) Influenzinum can be found at People's Pharmacy in the Austin area. 
 
Chinese medicine is a healing modality dating back centuries. Melissa Light LAc, MSOM of Austin, Texas gave the following information about how to use Chinese medicine during the flu season: "Colds and flu are seen as exterior conditions in traditional Chinese medicine. Exterior conditions such as cold and flu are easier to cure the sooner we notice the symptoms like: sore throat, body aches, runny nose, fatigue, headaches, fever, chills. In Chinese herbal medicine we can use the traditional formula jade screen daily during the cold and flu season as a preventative. We can also use this formula when everyone else in our family or at work are ill.   Texas Medicinals manufactures a jade screen tincture for light family acupuncture's chi kids line called b4vax. When you do notice some of the symptoms related to cold and flu, light family acupuncture also carries a cold and flu chi kids tincture called gan Mao ling and is safe for the entire family. Typically our appetites are less with colds and flu, but it is important to keep our fluids high especially if we also have fever.  We can get fluids from water, herbal teas, soups, stews, and fresh fruit and vegetable juices. Some great herbal teas for the season are: peppermint, ginger, cayenne red pepper and rose hips. Good foods for boosting the immune system include: cabbage, green peppers, garlic, turnips, broccoli and citrus fruits."(7)
 
One of the best ways to prevent any illness is to reduce stress. I hope this article aids in your stress reduction by giving you solid alternatives and researched information about preganancy and the flu.
 
All the best wishes for your optimal health and happiness! 
 
References:
1.  Rabin, Roni. 2012. "Reassessing Flu Shots as the Season Draws Near." New York Time's Well Blog, Nov. 5.
2.  Osterholm M, et al. Oct. 2012. "The Compelling Need for Game-Changing Influenza Vaccines: An analysis of the influenza vaccine enterprise and recommendations  
     for the future." 
3.  "Pregnant Women & Influenza (flu)." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
4.  Hahnemann, Samuel. 1833. Organon of Medicine. Online at: http://www.homeopathyhome.com/reference/organon/organon.html
5.  S., Ian. 2009. Homeopathy can prevent, cure swine flu. The Times of India, 18 Aug.
6.  Martinez, Lizzie. Classically trained homeopath found online at: www.lizziemartinez.com
7.  Light, Mellisa B. LAc, MSOM found online at: lightfamilyacupuncture.com
 

 

 

 

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New York Times article on Midwives in NYC

Posted by April Bullock on June 20th 2012. Tagged: . 0 Comments

There was an interesting article this weekend in, of all places, the Fashion and Style section of the Sunday New York Times! It is titled "The Midwife as Status Symbol" and discusses the recent increase in high profile women in New York City who are choosing midwives for their prenatal care and to attend their births. Please do not be mislead, this seems to be rather unique to large metropolitan areas but I believe it represents a shift in perception about who midwives are and how we practice. Physician attended births became the norm for high society and wealthy women long before it filtered down to the lower classes so hopefully this trend will follow the same trajectory; starting with getting insurance companies' attention about the savings possible by offering total coverage at in-network rates for midwifery attended births and pre- and postnatal care. It is always an exciting time to be a midwife but I feel we are currently on the precipice of a broader acceptance of our desire and ability to provide care for women experiencing normal pregnancies resulting in normal, natural deliveries. 

Here is the link for the article:

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/17/fashion/the-midwife-becomes-a-status-symbol-for-the-hip.html

Wishing you all the best!

Jayme Moore CPM, LM, HBCE

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Your Holistic Pregnancy- The 1st Trimester

Posted by April Bullock on December 4th 2011. Tagged: baby midwife pregnancy prenatal . 0 Comments

Your Holistic Pregnancy- The 1st Trimester

 

 

Pregnancy is such an exciting time in a woman’s life, but can also be a bit confusing and anxiety producing. With the myriad of information available today moms can be left wondering how to really best care for themselves and their babies. As more and more women seek holistic and natural healthcare and lifestyle options, I feel it is important to provide information to better achieve those goals.

Let’s start with the 1st trimester. Whew!! So much is going on in those short 13 weeks, oftentimes before anyone else is even aware of the pregnancy.

 

 

Weeks 1-3 post conception Growth and Development (weeks 3-5 post LMP): Conception occurs around day 14 of a normal 28 day menstrual cycle, when ovulation occurs. At this point the body begins changing it’s hormonal signals as the cells begin a rapid series of division. By day 5-6 the blastocyst attaches itself into the wall of the uterus. The embryo implants itself more deeply in the endometrium from days 7-12. After the embryo imbeds itself into the uterus and the beginnings of the placenta begin to form, these are known as the chorionic villi. By the end of the 5th week post LMP the heart begins to contract.

 

What you may be feeling:

Typically, most moms are feeling quite normal at this point in their pregnancies. You may feel some breast tenderness or bloating and cramping, which can mimic the onset of a normal period. By week 4 post LMP you’re probably wondering where that period is and can get a positive pregnancy result on a home pregnancy test.

 

What can you do?

Maintain a healthy lifestyle. Continue to exercise, eat lots of fruits, veggies and low processed foods. Rest as you’re tired. Begin taking prenatal vitamins if you weren’t taking them already.

 

Weeks 4-6 post conception Growth and Development (weeks 6-8 post LMP): By week 4 the forebrain and hindbrain are easily distinguished and the very beginnings of the lungs, liver, stomach, pancreas and thyroid gland are developing. Additionally, the eye is forming and all limb buds are present by the 4th week post conception. The ear begins to form by the end of the 6th week post conception.  By the 6th week post LMP the uterus is roughly the size of a clementine, that’s about twice the size of a non-pregnant uterus; and your baby resembles a tadpole and is about 4mm in length. The 1st pair of salivary glands begins to develop around week 8 post LMP.

 

What you may be feeling:

You are probably feeling pretty tired, and nausea may have set in around the 7th week post LMP. Many moms also feel very bloated and emotional. Additionally, you may be making more frequent trips to the bathroom as the uterus begins to press on your bladder. 

 

What can you do?

Because all major organ systems are forming, it is very important to eliminate unhealthy substances in your life, which may damage your growing baby such as alcohol, tobacco, some medications, and excessive caffeine.  Continue to eat a healthy diet and maintain an exercise moderate exercise routine. You may want to eat smaller, more frequent meals to help minimize nausea and the bloating feeling.

Ginger and mint can be helpful for nausea.

 

Weeks 7-9 post conception (weeks 9-11 post LMP) Growth and Development:

By the end of week 8 your baby is out of the embryonic period and into the fetal period, and the heart has begun beating. While external genitalia are developed they are neither male nor female at this point. During this period, however if you are carrying a boy, the baby will start producing testosterone in order to develop male genitalia. Fingernails begin to appear. The placenta will take over by the end of the 11th week post LMP. By the end of the 9th week LMP the Thyroid has reached its place in the neck. By the end of the 11th week, your baby weight about 7 grams and is about the 2.5” long. Your uterus is the size of a medium sized orange. Between the 8th and 11th week post LMP your midwife should be able to hear your baby’s heart beat with a Doppler device.

 

What you may be feeling:

You are probably still feeling pretty tired, and while the nausea and vomiting usually begins to lessen by the end of the 11th week, it can still be a nuisance. Your breasts are probably still tender and your clothing may begin to be too snug. Many moms have gained between 1-5 pounds by the end of their 11th week.

 

What can you do?

Continue to eat minimally processed foods. It is important to eat between 75-100g of protein and several serving of fruits and veggies per day, in addition to drinking at least ½ your body weight in ounces of water per day. By the 11th week post LMP you can have the first screen done- this is genetic screening utilizing a sonogram and a blood test.

 

Weeks 10-12 post conception (weeks 12-14 post LMP) Growth and Development:

By the end of the 13th week the 1st trimester is complete.  The external genitalia is fully differentiated by the end of the 14th week post LMP. The eyelids fuse and will stay fused until the 25th week. The mandible is developing- giving your baby a pronounced chin. By week 12 post LMP the 1st permanent teeth buds form. The palate is formed by week 14 post LMP and the taste buds develop during the 12-14th week post LMP.  Additionally, parathyroid hormone begins to be produced.  Your baby should be about the size of a peach by the end of the 13th week post LMP. Your uterus has moved into the abdominal cavity and is about the size of a large orange.

 

What you may be feeling:

By the end of the 13th week, most morning sickness has subsided and moms are entering into a more energetic 2nd trimester. You should be able to feel your uterus as a ball above your pubic bone, and have probably noticed that your clothes are not fitting as well as they used to. You may get your appetite back at this point.

 

What can you do?

Continue to take your high quality food based prenatal vitamins and eat well. This should be easier as the nausea is subsiding. Continue to exercise several times a week for at least 30 minutes per session. You should be on a regular schedule with your health care provider at this point. If you are unsure of where you want to give birth, now is a good time to start exploring all your possible options.

 

 

 

 

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News From The Big Push for Midwives Campaign

Posted by April Bullock on August 16th 2011. Tagged: . 0 Comments

 

This information is so very important for moms birthing in today's climate of fear. I worry that if we as consumers are not educated and willing to stand up for our rights to birth our babies in safe, gentle and respectful ways our cesarean rate will only increase. The case of the baby that is "just too big" and needs to be born by cesarean is something that is becomming all too common. As women, we have the right to understand how decisions are being made regarding ours and our babies healthcare. These decisions cannot be based on unreliable information.
PushNews from The Big Push for Midwives Campaign

Study: Two-Thirds of OB-GYN Clinical Guidelines Have No Basis in Science
Majority of ACOG Recommendations for Patient Care Found to Be Based on Opinion and Inconsistent Evidence

WASHINGTON, D.C. (August 15, 2011)—A study published this month in Obstetrics & Gynecology, the journal of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, found that barely one-third of the organization’s clinical guidelines for OB/GYN practice meet the Level A standard of “good and consistent scientific evidence.” The authors of the study found instead that the majority of ACOG recommendations for patient care rank at Levels B and C, based on research that relies on “limited or inconsistent evidence” and on “expert opinion,” both of which are known to be inadequate predictors of safety or efficacy.
“The fact that so few of the guidelines that govern routine OB/GYN care in this country are supported by solid scientific evidence—and worse, are far more likely to be based on anecdote and opinion—is a sobering reminder that our maternity care system is in urgent need of reform,” said Katherine Prown, PhD, Campaign Manager of The Big Push for Midwives. “As the authors of the study remind us, guidelines are only as good as the evidence that supports them.”
ACOG Practice Bulletin No. 22 on the management of fetal macrosomia—infants weighing roughly 8 1⁄2 lbs or more at birth—illustrates the possible risks to mothers and babies of relying on unscientific clinical guidelines. The only Level A evidence-based recommendation on the delivery of large-sized babies the Bulletin makes is to caution providers that the methods for detection are imprecise and unreliable. Yet at the same time, the Bulletin makes a Level C opinion-based recommendation that, despite the lack of a reliable diagnosis, women with “suspected” large babies should be offered potentially unnecessary cesarean sections as a precaution, putting mothers at risk of surgical complications and babies at risk of being born too early.
“It’s no wonder that the cesarean rate is going through the roof and women are seeking alternatives to hospital-based OB/GYN care in unprecedented numbers,” said Susan M. Jenkins, Legal Counsel of The Big Push for Midwives. “ACOG’s very own recommendations give its members permission to follow opinion- based practice guidelines that have far more to do with avoiding litigation than with adhering to scientific, evidence-based principles about what’s best for mothers and babies.”
The Big Push for Midwives Campaign represents tens of thousands of grassroots advocates in the United States who support expanding access to Certified Professional Midwives and out-of-hospital maternity care. The mission of The Big Push for Midwives is to educate state and national policymakers and the general public about the reduced costs and improved outcomes associated with out-of-hospital maternity care and to advocate for expanding access to the services of Certified Professional Midwives, who are specially trained to provide it.
The Big Push for Midwives Campaign | 2300 M Street, N.W., Suite 800 | Washington, D.C. 20037-1434 | PushforMidwives.org

PushNews from The Big Push for Midwives Campaign
Study: Two-Thirds of OB-GYN Clinical Guidelines Have No Basis in ScienceMajority of ACOG Recommendations for Patient Care Found to Be Based on Opinion and Inconsistent EvidenceWASHINGTON, D.C. (August 15, 2011)—A study published this month in Obstetrics & Gynecology, the journal of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, found that barely one-third of the organization’s clinical guidelines for OB/GYN practice meet the Level A standard of “good and consistent scientific evidence.” The authors of the study found instead that the majority of ACOG recommendations for patient care rank at Levels B and C, based on research that relies on “limited or inconsistent evidence” and on “expert opinion,” both of which are known to be inadequate predictors of safety or efficacy.“The fact that so few of the guidelines that govern routine OB/GYN care in this country are supported by solid scientific evidence—and worse, are far more likely to be based on anecdote and opinion—is a sobering reminder that our maternity care system is in urgent need of reform,” said Katherine Prown, PhD, Campaign Manager of The Big Push for Midwives. “As the authors of the study remind us, guidelines are only as good as the evidence that supports them.”ACOG Practice Bulletin No. 22 on the management of fetal macrosomia—infants weighing roughly 8 1⁄2 lbs or more at birth—illustrates the possible risks to mothers and babies of relying on unscientific clinical guidelines. The only Level A evidence-based recommendation on the delivery of large-sized babies the Bulletin makes is to caution providers that the methods for detection are imprecise and unreliable. Yet at the same time, the Bulletin makes a Level C opinion-based recommendation that, despite the lack of a reliable diagnosis, women with “suspected” large babies should be offered potentially unnecessary cesarean sections as a precaution, putting mothers at risk of surgical complications and babies at risk of being born too early.“It’s no wonder that the cesarean rate is going through the roof and women are seeking alternatives to hospital-based OB/GYN care in unprecedented numbers,” said Susan M. Jenkins, Legal Counsel of The Big Push for Midwives. “ACOG’s very own recommendations give its members permission to follow opinion- based practice guidelines that have far more to do with avoiding litigation than with adhering to scientific, evidence-based principles about what’s best for mothers and babies.”The Big Push for Midwives Campaign represents tens of thousands of grassroots advocates in the United States who support expanding access to Certified Professional Midwives and out-of-hospital maternity care. The mission of The Big Push for Midwives is to educate state and national policymakers and the general public about the reduced costs and improved outcomes associated with out-of-hospital maternity care and to advocate for expanding access to the services of Certified Professional Midwives, who are specially trained to provide it.

The Big Push for Midwives Campaign | 2300 M Street, N.W., Suite 800 | Washington, D.C. 20037-1434 | PushforMidwives.org

 

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We're Moving!

Posted by April Bullock on July 27th 2011. Tagged: . 0 Comments

Woo hoo! Change is a happening at Birthwise. After months and months of searching for the perfect location we've finally found it. We're moving all the fabulous East-West ladies into one very awesome house at 1709 Rio Grande. Our transformation should be complete by September 15th! Not only will we continue to offer all our holistic healthcare, but we will also be incorporating a larger yoga studio and pilates space.

In addition to being able to offer great movement opportunities for the community Birthwise will be adding 2 additional fabulous midwives. NatalieLake CPM, LM and Jayme Moore CPM, LM will be more officially joining the Birthwise team. Natalie has been a homebirth midwife for the past 10 years and has been officing out of East-West since 2008. Jayme Moore started at Birthwise as an apprentice in 2008 and Licensed earlier this year. 

The birth center will have 2 large birthing rooms, each around 200 sq ft. with high ceilings, hardwood floors and its own deep soaking birth tub and shower. A kitchenette is available for families to use during their stay at the birth center and we have plenty of comfortable seating for family to relax in on the big day. We will also have 2 exam rooms located on the main floor of the house, each with lots of natural light and space.

This move, while it has been and will continue to be very challenging will be equally as rewarding. I can hardly believe that my dream of pulling such a wonderful community of holistic healthcare practitioners together has grown into the thriving family that it has.

1709 Rio Grande

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Postpartum Tips

Posted by Matt McCloskey on February 22nd 2011. Tagged: tips . 0 Comments

Postpartum Tips and Resources

We prepare ourselves so well for our pregnancy and birth, but oftentimes we are ill prepared for the immediate postpartum period. It is so important for us to respect not only our bodies but our new baby and growing family through the transition from intrauterine to extrauterine life. In many cultures the postpartum period lasts 40 days, during which the mother rarely if ever leaves the house. She is taken care of by close friends or family members who prepare special foods for postpartum strength and healing, provide massage, and offer a shoulder to lean on an an ear to listen. While it can be difficult to achieve this type of postpartum here in the states, it is possible with planning to come very very close.

  • Look into local Red Tents or Care Calendars- these coordinate community members to provide meals and other assistance, such as pet care, light cleaning, running errands, childcare, etc during times of need. Enlist a friend or family member to create one at a baby shower.
  • Prepare large meals that freeze well during the last few weeks of pregnancy. Eat some, then freeze the rest into family and individual sized portions with re-heating instructions for use after the birth.
  • Have a house preparation/cleaning/organizing shower to prepare for not only the birth but to make life easier postpartum as well.
  • Make frozen maxi-pads for postpartum perineal relief. Simply wet a maxi- pad with water or sitz bath tea, wrap in plastic wrap or put into a ziploc and place in the freezer. These feel great on a swollen and tender perineum after the birth.
  • Know where your Arnica homeopathic pellets are. If you do not have any, buy some at your local health food store. Arnica is great for bruising and swelling.
  • Purchase pre-made sitz bath herbs from your local herbalist or prepare some yourself using Comfrey, Lavendar, Witch Hazel, Calendua, Yarrow, Uva Ursi and Sea Salt.
  • Purchase pre-made perineal spray from your local herbalist or prepare sitz bath tea and fill a peri bottle with it.
  • Make sure to have liquid Chloraphyll or ChlorOxygen on hand for blood building after the birth.

Keep in mind that the 1st week is often times the hardest for everyone in terms of breastfeeding, postpartum discomfort and exhaustion. Give yourself time to heal and get to know your new baby.

This list by no means encompasses all that we can do to prepare for the postpartum period but should be a good start for ensuring a fabulous postpartum transition.

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Breastfeeding Awareness

Posted by Matt McCloskey on January 12th 2011. Tagged: breastfeeding . 0 Comments

Check this out. Why aren’t we promoting breastfeeding this way here in the states?

Australian Breastfeeding Awareness Ad

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Eating Seasonally- Rough Recipes Included

Posted by Matt McCloskey on November 18th 2010. Tagged: recipes . 0 Comments

Well, the weather is finally cooling a bit and I have been loving to cook richer and heartier fare. Over the past week I’ve made Tempeh Chili, Chicken Noodle Soup, and cannot seem to get enough dark green leafies- Kale is at all the farmer’s markets these days. Not only are soups easy, they are also a great way to use any veggies that are a little past their prime, which is great for me, as I always seem to have a few stragglers at the end of the week from my local produce basket. Another thing I absolutely LOVE about making a huge pot of soup is that I can freeze various size portions for later. This makes those crazy 12 hour days much easier- and I know my family is still getting healthy food. So, I’ll include the recipes for the Chili and the Chicken Noodle Soup.

Tempeh Chili- which is loaded with protein, by the way!!

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Caring for yourself during pregnancy: tips

Posted by Matt McCloskey on October 11th 2010. Tagged: tips . 0 Comments

So much of my time as a midwife is spent counseling women on making healthful choices to ensure that they create an optimal environment for their babies to grow. Here are my Top  10 Tips:

1. Eat whole foods- this means foods that are unrefined and in their purest form, find your local farmer’s markets for foods as close to the source as possible.

2. Eat 80 grams of protein per day. It is possible to get this much protein without eating animal products as well. Brown rice, whole wheat bread and whole wheat pasta all have protein- who would’ve thought? Kale and broccoli have 5 grams  of  protein per serving.

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The Holistic 1st Aid Kit

Posted by Matt McCloskey on May 5th 2010. Tagged: holistic . 0 Comments

I am so excited to teach the Holistic 1st Aid Kit again. It has been my most popular class yet. I really wish that I had this information when my oldest son was a baby nearly 15 years ago. I had to read through book after book to find alternative remedies and treatments for any illness or ailment that came up. I’m so happy to be able to offer families a comprehensive yet easily understandable class to help them through fevers, bumps, bruises, stomach upsets and so much more. Our next class will be held on Wed May 19th from 12pm-1:15pm with Free Childcare offered. I look forward to seeing you all!!

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